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Plugins

BunkerWeb comes with a plugin system making it possible to easily add new features. Once a plugin is installed, you can manage it using additional settings defined by the plugin.

Official plugins

Here is the list of "official" plugins that we maintain (see the bunkerweb-plugins repository for more information) :

Name Version Description Link
ClamAV 0.1 Automatically scans uploaded files with the ClamAV antivirus engine and denies the request when a file is detected as malicious. bunkerweb-plugins/clamav
CrowdSec 0.1 CrowdSec bouncer for BunkerWeb. bunkerweb-plugins/crowdsec
Discord 0.1 Send security notifications to a Discord channel using a Webhook. bunkerweb-plugins/discord
Slack 0.1 Send security notifications to a Slack channel using a Webhook. bunkerweb-plugins/slack
VirusTotal 0.1 Automatically scans uploaded files with the VirusTotal API and denies the request when a file is detected as malicious. bunkerweb-plugins/virustotal

How to use a plugin

Automatic

If you want to quickly install external plugins, you can use the EXTERNAL_PLUGIN_URLS setting. It takes a list of URLs, separated with space, pointing to compressed (zip format) archive containing one or more plugin(s).

You can use the following value if you want to automatically install the official plugins : EXTERNAL_PLUGIN_URLS=https://github.com/bunkerity/bunkerweb-plugins/archive/refs/tags/v0.2.zip

Manual

The first step is to install the plugin by putting the plugin files inside the corresponding plugins data folder, the procedure depends on your integration :

When using the Docker integration, plugins must be written to the volume mounted on /data.

The first thing to do is to create the plugins folder :

mkdir -p ./bw-data/plugins

Then, you can drop the plugins of your choice into that folder :

git clone https://github.com/bunkerity/bunkerweb-plugins && \
cp -rp ./bunkerweb-plugins/* ./bw-data/plugins

Because BunkerWeb runs as an unprivileged user with UID and GID 101, you will need to edit the permissions :

chown -R root:101 bw-data && \
chmod -R 770 bw-data

When starting the BunkerWeb container, you will need to mount the folder on /data :

docker run \
       ...
       -v "${PWD}/bw-data:/data" \
       ...
       bunkerity/bunkerweb:1.4.5

Here is the docker-compose equivalent :

mybunker:
  image: bunkerity/bunkerweb:1.4.5
  volumes:
    - ./bw-data:/data
  ...

When using the Docker autoconf integration, plugins must be written to the volume mounted on /data.

The easiest way to do it is by starting the Docker autoconf stack with a folder mounted on /data (instead of a named volume). Once the stack is started, you can copy the plugins of your choice to the plugins folder from your host :

git clone https://github.com/bunkerity/bunkerweb-plugins && \
cp -rp ./bunkerweb-plugins/* ./bw-data/plugins

Because BunkerWeb runs as an unprivileged user with UID and GID 101, you will need to edit the permissions :

chown -R root:101 bw-data && \
chmod -R 770 bw-data

When using the Swarm integration, the easiest way of installing plugins is by using docker exec and downloading the plugins from the container.

Execute a shell inside the autoconf container (use docker ps to get the name) :

docker exec -it myautoconf /bin/bash

Once you have a shell inside the container, you will be able to drop the plugins of your choice inside the /data/plugins folder :

git clone https://github.com/bunkerity/bunkerweb-plugins && \
cp -rp ./bunkerweb-plugins/* /data/plugins

When using the Kubernetes integration, the easiest way of installing plugins is by using kubectl exec and downloading the plugins from the container.

Execute a shell inside the autoconf container (use kubectl get pods to get the name) :

kubectl exec -it myautoconf -- /bin/bash

Once you have a shell inside the container, you will be able to drop the plugins of your choice inside the /data/plugins folder :

git clone https://github.com/bunkerity/bunkerweb-plugins && \
cp -rp ./bunkerweb-plugins/* /data/plugins

When using the Linux integration, plugins must be written to the /opt/bunkerweb/plugins folder :

git clone https://github.com/bunkerity/bunkerweb-plugins && \
cp -rp ./bunkerweb-plugins/* /data/plugins

When using the Ansible integration, you can use the plugins variable to set a local folder containing your plugins that will be copied to your BunkerWeb instances.

Let's assume that you have plugins inside the bunkerweb-plugins folder :

git clone https://github.com/bunkerity/bunkerweb-plugins

In your Ansible inventory, you can use the plugins variable to set the path of plugins folder :

[mybunkers]
192.168.0.42 ... custom_plugins="{{ playbook_dir }}/bunkerweb-plugins"

Or alternatively, in your playbook file :

- hosts: all
  become: true
  vars:
    - custom_plugins: "{{ playbook_dir }}/bunkerweb-plugins"
  roles:
    - bunkerity.bunkerweb

Run the playbook :

ansible-playbook -i inventory.yml playbook.yml

Writing a plugin

Existing plugins

If the documentation is not enough, you can have a look at the existing source code of official plugins and the core plugins (already included in BunkerWeb but they are plugins, technically speaking).

The first step is to create a folder that will contain the plugin :

mkdir myplugin && \
cd myplugin

Metadata

A file named plugin.json and written at the root of the plugin folder must contain metadata about the plugin. Here is an example :

{
    "id": "myplugin",
    "order": 42,
    "name": "My Plugin",
    "description": "Just an example plugin.",
    "version": "1.0",
    "settings": {
        "DUMMY_SETTING": {
            "context": "multisite",
            "default": "1234",
            "help": "Here is the help of the setting.",
            "id": "dummy-id",
            "label": "Dummy setting",
            "regex": "^.*$",
            "type": "text"
        }
    }
    "jobs": [
        {
            "name": "my-job",
            "file": "my-job.py",
            "every": "hour"
        }
    ]
}

Here are the details of the fields :

Field Mandatory Type Description
id yes string Internal ID for the plugin : must be unique among other plugins (including "core" ones) and contain only lowercase chars.
order yes int When the plugin should be executed during the access phase : 1 for whitelisting, 2 for blacklisting, 3 for "standard security feature" or 999 if your settings don't use the access phase.
name yes string Name of your plugin.
description yes string Description of your plugin.
version yes string Version of your plugin.
settings yes dict List of the settings of your plugin.
jobs no list List of the jobs of your plugin.

Each setting has the following fields (the key is the ID of the settings used in a configuration) :

Field Mandatory Type Description
context yes string Context of the setting : multisite or global.
default yes string The default value of the setting.
help yes string Help text about the plugin (shown in web UI).
id yes string Internal ID used by the web UI for HTML elements.
label yes string Label shown by the web UI.
regex yes string The regex used to validate the value provided by the user.
type yes string The type of the field : text, check or select.
multiple no string Unique ID to group multiple settings with numbers as suffix.
select no list List of possible string values when type is select.

Each job has the following fields :

Field Mandatory Type Description
name yes string Name of the job.
file yes string Name of the file inside the jobs folder.
every yes string Job scheduling frequency : minute, hour, day, week or once (no frequency, only once before (re)generating the configuration).

Configurations

You can add custom NGINX configurations by adding a folder named confs with content similar to the custom configurations. Each subfolder inside the confs will contain jinja2 templates that will be generated and loaded at the corresponding context (http, server-http and default-server-http).

Here is an example for a configuration template file inside the confs/server-http folder named example.conf :

location /setting {
    default_type 'text/plain';
    content_by_lua_block {
        ngx.say('{{ DUMMY_SETTING }}')
    }
}

{{ DUMMY_SETTING }} will be replaced by the value of the DUMMY_SETTING chosen by the user of the plugin.

LUA

Main script

Under the hood, BunkerWeb is using the NGINX LUA module to execute code within NGINX. Plugins that need to execute code must provide a lua file at the root directory of the plugin folder using the id value of plugin.json as its name. Here is an example named myplugin.lua :

local _M        = {}
_M.__index      = _M

local utils     = require "utils"
local datastore = require "datastore"
local logger    = require "logger"

function _M.new()
    local self = setmetatable({}, _M)
    self.dummy = "dummy"
    return self, nil
end

function _M:init()
    logger.log(ngx.NOTICE, "MYPLUGIN", "init called")
    return true, "success"
end

function _M:access()
    logger.log(ngx.NOTICE, "MYPLUGIN", "access called")
    return true, "success", nil, nil
end

function _M:log()
    logger.log(ngx.NOTICE, "MYPLUGIN", "log called")
    return true, "success"
end

function _M:log_default()
    logger.log(ngx.NOTICE, "MYPLUGIN", "log_default called")
    return true, "success"
end

return _M

The declared functions are automatically called during specific contexts. Here are the details of each function :

Function Context Description Return value
init init_by_lua Called when NGINX just started or received a reload order. the typical use case is to prepare any data that will be used by your plugin. ret, err
  • ret (boolean) : true if no error or else false
  • err (string) : success or error message
access access_by_lua Called on each request received by the server. The typical use case is to do the security checks here and deny the request if needed. ret, err, return, status
  • ret (boolean) : true if no error or else false
  • err (string) : success or error message
  • return (boolean) : true if you want to stop the access phase and send a status to the client
  • status (number) : the return value to set if return is set to true
log log_by_lua Called when a request has finished (and before it gets logged to the access logs). The typical use case is to make stats or compute counters for example. ret, err
  • ret (boolean) : true if no error or else false
  • err (string) : success or error message
log_default log_by_lua Same as log but only called on the default server. ret, err
  • ret (boolean) : true if no error or else false
  • err (string) : success or error message

Libraries

All directives from NGINX LUA module are available. On top of that, you can use the LUA libraries included within BunkerWeb : see this script for the complete list.

If you need additional libraries, you can put them in the root folder of the plugin and access them by prefixing them with your plugin ID. Here is an example file named mylibrary.lua :

local _M = {}

_M.dummy = function ()
    return "dummy"
end

return _M

And here is how you can use it from the myplugin.lua file :

local mylibrary = require "myplugin.mylibrary"

...

mylibrary.dummy()

...

Helpers

Some helpers modules provide common helpful functions :

  • datastore : access the global shared data (key/value store)
  • logger : generate logs
  • utils : various useful functions

To access the functions, you first need to require the module :

...

local utils     = require "utils"
local datastore = require "datastore"
local logger    = require "logger"

...

Retrieve a setting value :

local value, err = utils:get_variable("DUMMY_SETTING")
if not value then
    logger.log(ngx.ERR, "MYPLUGIN", "can't retrieve setting DUMMY_SETTING : " .. err)
else
    logger.log(ngx.NOTICE, "MYPLUGIN", "DUMMY_SETTING = " .. value)
end

Store something in the cache :

local ok, err = datastore:set("plugin_myplugin_something", "somevalue")
if not value then
    logger.log(ngx.ERR, "MYPLUGIN", "can't save plugin_myplugin_something into datastore : " .. err)
else
    logger.log(ngx.NOTICE, "MYPLUGIN", "successfully saved plugin_myplugin_something into datastore into datastore")
end

Check if an IP address is global :

local ret, err = utils.ip_is_global(ngx.var.remote_addr)
if ret == nil then
    logger.log(ngx.ERR, "MYPLUGIN", "error while checking if IP " .. ngx.var.remote_addr .. " is global or not : " .. err)
elseif not ret then
    logger.log(ngx.NOTICE, "MYPLUGIN", "IP " .. ngx.var.remote_addr .. " is not global")
else
    logger.log(ngx.NOTICE, "MYPLUGIN", "IP " .. ngx.var.remote_addr .. " is global")
end

More examples

If you want to see the full list of available functions, you can have a look at the files present in the lua directory of the repository.

Jobs

BunkerWeb uses an internal job scheduler for periodic tasks like renewing certificates with certbot, downloading blacklists, downloading MMDB files, ... You can add tasks of your choice by putting them inside a subfolder named jobs and listing them in the plugin.json metadata file. Don't forget to add the execution permissions for everyone to avoid any problems when a user is cloning and installing your plugin.

Plugin page

Plugin pages are used to display information about your plugin and interact with the user inside the plugins section of the web UI.

Everything related to the web UI is located inside a subfolder named ui at the root directory of your plugin. A template file named template.html and located inside the ui subfolder contains the client code and logic to display your page. Another file named actions.py and also located inside the ui subfolder contains code that will be executed when the user is interacting with your page (filling a form for example).

Jinja 2 template

The template.html file is a Jinja2 template, please refer to the Jinja2 documentation if needed.

A plugin page can have a form that is used to submit data to the plugin. To get the values of the form, you need to put a actions.py file in the ui folder. Inside the file, you must define a function that has the same name as the plugin. This function will be called when the form is submitted. You can then use the request object (from the Flask library) to get the values of the form. The form's action must finish with /plugins/<plugin_id>. The helper function url_for will generate for you the prefix of the URL : {{ url_for('plugins') }}/plugin_id.

If you want to display variables generated from your actions.py in your template file, you can return a dictionary with variables name as keys and variables value as values. Here is dummy example where we return a single variable :

def myplugin() :
    return {"foo": "bar"}

And we display it in the template.html file :

{% if foo %}
Content of foo is : {{ foo }}.
{% endif %}

Please note that every form submission is protected via a CSRF token, you will need to include the following snippet into your forms :

<input type="hidden" name="csrf_token" value="{{ csrf_token() }}" />

Retrieving user submitted data is pretty simple, thanks to the request module provided by Flask :

from flask import request

def myplugin() :
    my_form_value = request.form["my_form_input"]

Python libraries

You can use Python libraries that are already available like : Flask, Flask-Login, Flask-WTF, beautifulsoup4, docker, Jinja2, python-magic and requests. To see the full list, you can have a look at the Web UI requirements.txt. If you need external libraries, you can install them inside the ui folder of your plugin and then use the classical import directive.